6/1/2021

Governor Polis took action in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

 

Governor Polis extended an Executive Order requiring the temporary suspension of certain statutes and rules to expand the healthcare workforce for hospitals and other inpatient treatment facilities due to the presence of COVID-19. 

 

Governor Polis also extended and amended an Executive Order related to the protection of tenants from eviction during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic in Colorado.

 

Under the amended Executive Order, landlords need to provide notice to tenants of the Department of Local Affairs (DOLA) resources and the order directs DOLA to work with landlords on providing repayment plans. Tenants have a 30-day period to cure any default for nonpayment of rent. The Executive Order will remain in place until July 31. 

HOW YOU CAN GET ASSISTANCE

Small Business Support

Sales Tax Relief and Fee Waivers for Small Businesses 

Broadband Assistance for Education 

Housing and Emergency Financial Assistance

Utility Assistance

Child Care Provider Relief

For the full list of resources click here

House Democrats hosted over 100 town halls in April and May to hear from Coloradans directly about how we could help our state get through the COVID-19 pandemic and recover. We passed a relief package to help Coloradans get back to work safely and make ends meet, enacting legislation to offer direct assistance to Coloradans, guarantee paid sick leave, and protect workers from retaliation when they report health concerns.  

We provided $20 million to create a small businesses grant program and established a $250 million small business loan fund; channeled $20 million in federal funds for direct housing assistance; and provided $4.8 million for utility assistance. We allocated $500,000 to food pantries to help them meet the increased needs of their communities. 

Demand for critical health and safety services has grown, so House Democrats put $15.2 million towards mental health and substance abuse programs, $500,000 towards programs that serve survivors of domestic violence, and $500,000 toward the 2-1-1 hotline that has been expanded as an information hub for Coloradans during the pandemic.

In the early months of the pandemic, House Democrats hosted over 100 town halls to hear from Coloradans directly about how we could help our state get through the COVID-19 pandemic and recover. Then in May, we passed a relief package to help Coloradans get back to work safely and make ends meet, enacting legislation to offer direct assistance to Coloradans, guarantee paid sick leave, and protect workers from retaliation when they report health concerns.  

We created a small businesses grant program and established a small business loan fund; channeled federal funds for direct housing assistance; and provided utility assistance. We allocated funds to food pantries to help them meet the increased needs of their communities. We also put millions towards mental health and substance abuse programs, programs that serve survivors of domestic violence, toward the 2-1-1 hotline that has been expanded as an information hub for Coloradans during the pandemic.

As months went by without further assistance from Washington, we knew it was up to Colorado to act. First, House Democrats took action with the Governor to direct $168 million in direct assistance to hundreds of thousands of Coloradans who have been hit hardest by the economic impacts of the pandemic. Then, we returned to the Capitol for a short and laser-focused special legislative session.

During the special session House Democrats delivered on direct relief for restaurants, bars and other struggling small businesses. We approved a package of bipartisan bills that will help families stay in their homes, put food on the table and keep the lights on and the heat going. These bills will also help working parents stay in the workforce with enhanced child care opportunities and expand broadband access so students and teachers can continue to learn through the months ahead.

Demand for critical health and safety services has grown, so House Democrats put $15.2 million towards mental health and substance abuse programs, $500,000 towards programs that serve survivors of domestic violence, and $500,000 toward the 2-1-1 hotline that has been expanded as an information hub for Coloradans during the pandemic.